F Simple and Serene Living: new gardens for a changing world 09 10
Saturday, April 5, 2014

new gardens for a changing world

Gardening is changing, and it is a good thing. We are moving away from chemical fertilizers and pesticides. They may have been keeping our lawns green and pretty, but they are decimating the natural habitats of bees, butterflies, and wildlife. 


Most of us worry about the environmental degradation of our planet but wonder how we can help. Maybe we live in an apartment, as I do with no real green space. Maybe we have a pretty green yard bordered by flower beds and ornamental shrubs. Maybe we have imported flowers and plants that are not native to our area and are therefore hard to sustain. 


So how do we contribute.

Jane Goodall has written a new book called Seeds of Hope, where she talks about sustainable foods and gardening.

source

Each one of us can contribute, in our own small way, and if we do so, then as a collective force we can help to turn around the degradation. 



As I age, I realize that I will not be here forever, but I want to leave this earth a better place for my daughters, grandchildren and their future children. 




So before I plant any pots on my patio this year I am going to do some research on what native plants I can use. I would like to use some plants that I can bring into the house next winter to enjoy on my windowsills. I am also going to wash out my dirty bird feeders and start feeding the birds again. 

Do you practice any kind of sustainable gardening?


P.S. I have not been compensated for promoting this book. I just love what Jane Goodall does. 









 

16 comments:

  1. I always use plants that are common to our area so that I don't have to do all they gymnastics needed to keep other species alive. I do organic gardening as best I can but could probably do more and we do use a weed and feed on our lawn-otherwise we would have an acre of weeds- xo Diana

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  2. When I had a garden we were organic gardeners, I like you ideas.

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  3. Laura, When I want to take care of plants...I spray them with plain water.. Like Diana, we treat the lawn also...but only for what it needs not just to be having that lawn man here. You never need as much stuff on the lawn as they would love for you to believe. xoxo,Susie

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  4. I use what grows in my neck of the woods also, it is a sure thing they will thrive that way.

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  5. It's worth is to do some research and find out what grows best. We don't garden any more...but did for most of our lives. It's very enjoyable. We have one pepper plant with a pepper on it right now though! lol Hugs!

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  6. I'm one of the lucky ones married to a horticulturist who only uses chemicals as a last resort and who patient with customers at the nursery and takes time to pass on his knowledge

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  7. I think it's a great idea to use native plants! When we moved here years ago, after all the construction, by the time we were ready to plant grass, native grasses had already started springing up. We've learned that native grasses are perfect because they can take the climate. Others can't. God calls us to be good stewards of His creation, and that involves being careful with the soil and to use our resources wisely, not foolishly or extravagantly. That's why farmers have been doing rotational cropping for years, keeping the soil nutrients at their optimum. If they hadn't, they wouldn't have a crop to feed their livestock.

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  8. I did not know she wrote a book! This is fabulous! WA state is all about this sort of thing and we DO plant indigenous plants in our yard:) It's wonderful to hear that you are looking into this type of gardening. Good for you!

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  9. I love Jane Goodall too! Will definitely get the book! Have a great weekend, sweet Laura.

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  10. I do try to use native plants. You have so much better luck with them.
    Brenda

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  11. I try as much as I can to use native plants. I weed by hand rather than using any chemical product and I have a compost bin in the garden... Trying to do my small part!

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  12. I bet her book is great! Hope you're enjoying your weekend!

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  13. Sounds like an interesting read. We always plant native plants in our yard. I don't understand why anyone would try to grow something that isn't native to their area anyway. It's likely to need a lot of TLC and just end up dying.

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  14. I buy heirloom seeds that are native to KY. Barbara Kingsolver's book, "Animal, Vegetable, Miracle", inspired me a few years ago to make major changes. Thank you for the suggestion of Jane's book.

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  15. Great ideas Laura, and yes together we can make it happen. I've always been a organic no pesticide kind of gardener, and now the bugs are kind of winning up here, but I am trying my best.

    Jen

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  16. Laura, what a lovely post. I don’t buy ripe bananas at my age, but I do still plant trees. Happy Spring!!

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